The Frontier of the Yukon

My trip to the Yukon was part of a Holland America Alaskan Cruise and Inland Tour combination. Refer to my post Alaska and Yukon Cruise with Holland America for a full discussion of my experience.  From Skagway, Alaska, I took the White Pass train into the Yukon and traveled via bus for the rest of the Yukon adventure.

Carcross, Yukon:

This rustic trading post is made up of a handful of buildings including a general store, trading post, and bakery. The bakery is an absolute must for their delicious scones.

Not too far from Carcross is Emerald Lake. A gorgeous lake in the middle of the mountains that glows with an emerald sheen in the sunlight.

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We traveled along the Yukon River on our way to Dawson City stopping briefly at the Moose Creek Lodge for some delicious sausage rolls and strawberry rhubarb tarts.

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Dawson City, Yukon:

Dawson City’s dirt roads and frontier atmosphere are a step back in time. Located right along the Yukon River, Dawson City was a base during the Klondike Gold Rush and many of the original structures are preserved today.

While in Dawson, head to the Dawson City Museum for a history lesson on the Gold Rush and an exhibit of antique trains and train engines. Grab a cone of homemade ice cream and the Klondyke Ice Cream and Candy parlor. Don’t forget to head to Diamond Tooth Gerties for some casino games and can can show.

If you’re brave enough, head to the Sourdough Saloon in the Downtown Hotel for a Sourtoe Cocktail. This is a Dawson City tradition and is pretty much how it sounds: an actual human toe that has been dehydrated and preserved in salt is used to garnish a drink of your choice. Legend has it, the first toe belonged to a miner and rum runner named Louie Liken. Louie had to have his frostbitten toe amputated in the 1920s and he preserved it in a jar of alcohol in his cabin as a keepsake. In 1973, Captain Dick Stevenson, a Yukon local, found the jar containing the toe while cleaning a cabin. Captain Dick brought the toe down to the Sourdough Saloon and started plunking it into the drinks of those who were brave enough. Thus, the Sourtoe Cocktail Club was formed. Several toes have been donated since then and one rule remains consistent: “You can drink it fast, you can drink it slow—but the lips have gotta touch the toe.”

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Dempster Highway and Tombstone Park:

Take a ride along the Dempster Highway into Tombstone Territorial Park. This ride offers a great opportunity to explore the park and its unique permafrost landscape.

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Continental Divide

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From here the tour took us over the Top of the World Highway back into Alaska. Refer to my post Rugged Coast and Mountains of Alaska for information on the Alaska part of this journey.

3 thoughts on “The Frontier of the Yukon

  1. TinderellaAnna says:

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    Have a great December!

    Like

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